Cart ()

Prosecutor Cites Exculpatory Evidence in George Floyd Case, Then Walks It Back

Prosecutor Cites Exculpatory Evidence in George Floyd Case, Then Walks It Back

The top Minneapolis prosecutor raised doubts over whether the officers in George Floyd’s death would be charged on Thursday, citing “other evidence.”

"My job in the end is to prove he violated a criminal statute. And there is other evidence that does not support a criminal charge,” said Hennepin County Attorney Mike Freeman. “We need to wade through all of that evidence and come to a meaningful decision and we are doing that to the best of our ability."

Freeman walks back comment:

Shortly after the briefing, Freeman’s office issued a statement walking back his comments.

The statement argued that the comment is being “misrepresented.”

“To clarify, [he] was saying that is is critical to review all the evidence because at the time of the trial, invariably, all that information will be used,” the statement said. “Evidence not favorable to our case needs to be carefully examined to understand the full picture of what actually happened.”

“This happens in every case,” the statement added. “This statement does not indicate in any way the horror that we all feel when viewing the video. As in any case, it is simply a matter of adequately preparing for trial.”

Baltimore prosecutor weighs in:

Baltimore County State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby hit out Freeman’s comments after he pointed to her experience with the Freddie Gray case.

“We have to do this right. We have to prove it in a court of law,” Freeman said Thursday. “And I will just point to you the comparison with what happened in Baltimore in the Gray case. It was a rush to charge, it was a rush to justice, and all of those people were found not guilty.”

“Saying that there was ‘a rush to charge, a rush to justice’ in the Freddie Gray case is demonstrably false,” Mosby said in response. “I stand by the decision I made 12 days after Freddie Gray was killed. I didn’t have video footage of a murder — evidence any prosecutor would dream of.”

“Mr. Freeman needs to own his decisions and be courageous enough to decide whether or not to prosecute and pursue justice for the murder of George Floyd,” she added.