Women’s March Demands Linda Sarsour, Key Organisers Resign for Anti-Semitism

Women’s March Demands Linda Sarsour, Key Organisers Resign for Anti-Semitism

Linda Sarsour, the controversial progressive activist responsible for co-leading the Women’s March, is being held to account for her anti-Semitic views. Just when the organization helped secure a record number of female victories during the 2018 mid-term elections, its original founder Teresa Shook sent current management into turmoil when she released a public statement calling on key leadership figures to resign following continued accusations of “hateful, racist rhetoric” against the Jewish people.

“Bob Bland, Tamika Mallory, Linda Sarsour and Carmen Perez have steered the Movement away from its true course,” Shook wrote Monday, condemning the activists on her public Facebook page. “I have waited, hoping they would right the ship. But they have not. In opposition to our Unity Principles, they have allowed anti-Semitism, anti-LBGTQIA sentiment and hateful, racist rhetoric to become a part of the platform by their refusal to separate themselves from groups that espouse these racist, hateful beliefs. Therefore, I call for the current Co-Chairs to step down and to let others lead who can restore faith in the Movement and its original intent.”

The unmentioned link throughout her statement is Louis Farrakhan, the leader of the political-religious group The Nation of Islam (NOI), who isn’t shy about expressing hatred for minority groups valued under the intersectional progressive orthodoxy of the Women’s March. 

Earlier this year, our publication showed video evidence of how Farrakhan brands the Jewish people his “sworn enemies,” whether it’s through his spreading of neo-Nazi conspiracy theories accusing them of trying to create a “new world order” that “serves Satan,” blaming Jewish people for somehow perpetuating the slave trade, condemning support for LGBT rights in Israel which he claims “feminizes men” into sinners, and even went as far as to praise Nazi dictator Adolf Hitler as being a “very great man.”

“These false Jews,” Farrakhan preached to his audience, “promote the filth of Hollywood that is seeding the American people and the people of the world and bringing you down in moral strength. It’s the wicked Jews, the false Jews, that are promoting lesbianism, homosexuality. It’s the wicked Jews, false Jews, that make it a crime for you to preach the word of God, then they call you homophobic! These satanic Jews run the media! Run the government! Run the world! And they are my enemy!”

In December 2017, when Sarsour was questioned about these truthful claims of anti-Semitism, she proceeded to condemn not the regressive beliefs of her associate, but the progressive “Jewish media” reporting on the stories in the first place. 

“If what you’re reading all day long, morning and night, in the Jewish media is that Linda Sarsour and Minister Farrakhan are the existential threats to the Jewish community,” the activist screamed, “something really bad is gonna happen and we gonna miss the mark on it.” For almost a year, Sarsour has failed to clarify what she meant by “something really bad,” which could fairly be interpreted as a form of incitement to violence in solidarity with her fellow hate-monger.

During a tirade in February 2018, Farrakhan recognized Mallory in the audience and praised the Women’s March co-leader for her pro-black activism, later making collectivist claims of Jews being responsible for the death of Jesus, which he said deserved some form of retribution. This resulted in bipartisan criticism calling on the activists to condemn their hate preacher for his “unapologetic bigotry,” which only resulted in Mallory doubling down in posting “Farrakhan is the greatest of all time (“GOAT”) and that “if your leader does not have the same enemies as Jesus, they may not be THE leader!”

These comments resulted in several key lower-level staffers resigning from the organization in protest, demanding an apology which never came. The scandal continued earlier this week after news of progressive activist and actress Alyssa Milano declaring she could no longer support a bigoted movement. 

“Any time that there is any bigotry or anti-Semitism in that respect, it needs to be called out and addressed. I’m disappointed in the leadership of the Women’s March that they haven’t done it adequately,” Milano told an interviewer at The Advocate.

Linda Sarsour, ever the gas-lighting reactionary, tried to accuse Milano herself of bigotry for condemning bigotry:

“I don’t think these people have our best interests at heart to make us better people or to disrupt misconceptions or anti-Semitism because trashing a strong black woman and holding her accountable for the words of a man is not the way to bring people together,” she published on Facebook. “What work are we willing to do and are we willing to be open to the true idea that members of the NOI are not all anti-Semites? Are we cool with broad brushing a whole group?” 

Farrakhan doesn’t seem to have a problem that, of course. Dare to question these broad brushing accusations and you’re suddenly the bigot against people of color (who, as it turns out, can also be bigots). 

“We are imperfect,” the organization’s leaders said in a statement, thanking Shook for her service with a backhanded refutation accusing her of “attempting in this moment to take advantage of our growing pains to try and fracture our network.” 

There’s no reason to believe this is true. Shook still maintains her feminist beliefs, as do her their former employees, who specifically resigned for being to the left of their on-record hateful speeches. The march frames itself as a progressive form of “resistance feminism” set on destroying systemic structures and political figures who perpetuate inequality. As Mallory said, “ostracizing, ridicule and rejection is a painful part of the process,” but this is projection when it comes to the untouched daddy Farrakhan, embodying the grotesque fringe from where their leadership derive meaning.

It’s time that the Women’s March rid itself of any connection to people like Louis Farrakhan.