The Tyranny of the Rich: Why You Shouldn't Trust Those Who Own You

Conspiracy

It's shocking to think how much has changed over the last two decades. Stereotypes that were accepted throughout the 20th century were radically changed in the last sixteen years.

In the same way, music, pop culture, and fashion have transformed- sometimes gradually, sometimes radically. Elements of our political landscape and culture have changed significantly since the fateful 2000 Election. However, few people have realized it.

Let me know if this sounds familiar: Republicans are the big-business party that will favor the rich and ignore working class people- Democrats are the party of the minorities and poor, who will help the working class form unions and earn a living wage.

This is the big lie that the left has forced down our throats for decades. It may have been partly true during the Ragin' Reagan decade of the 1980's, but since Big W's time in office, we've seen a dramatic shift in the way the Democrats have played their game of politics.

This election has rewritten many rules, many "standards" that we thought were true about our country. That goes beyond the grossly inaccurate polls.

The electoral map was redrawn in this election. Long time blue states- that haven't voted Republican in over a generation- flipped red. States like Wisconsin, Michigan, Ohio, and Pennsylvania, gave Trump a landslide electoral win. Working class Americans, who have strongly supported Democrats and their pro-union stance, flocked to Trump after he promised to punish companies that outsourced jobs to Mexico.

But why was Trump in such an amazing position to steal the support of working class Americans? Hillary Clinton, the wife of former President Bill Clinton, should have been the symbol of working class America. They should have flocked to her side as the Democratic nominee. But they didn't.

Perhaps it's because Hillary is a strong supporter of Wall Street, the big businesses that funded her campaign. Perhaps it's because the Clinton Foundation, created after Bill left the White House in 2000, has taken money, and supported international billionaires and foreign nations often blamed for the erosion of American jobs.

Trump, meanwhile, was self-funded during the primaries and took record-setting small donations during the general election. He made it clear to the millions of working class Americans who are suffering that he was going to support them- that wealthy special interests would have no leverage over a Trump Presidency.

This election has flipped the script of modern politics, yet the perception remains the same. Many Americans still believe that Democrats are the party of the working class and poor, even though their candidate most certainly favored her uber-rich donors. People still like to say it's the Republicans who favor the rich, even after Donald Trump rebuked Ford for outsourcing American jobs, promising to punish them with tariffs.

But this reversal of stances is even more prevalent than that. Many major companies backed Hillary Clinton. And I don't mean the out-of-touch elitists in Hollywood. Tech giants in Silicon Valley have been outspoken in their support for Hillary Clinton. Big businesses like Google, who control much of the information you see, were outspoken in their support of the Democrat.

Why would big businesses, that deal in profits over the billion mark, want to support Hillary- if she was, in fact, the candidate for the little guy? Why would business owners be so outspoken in their rejection of Donald Trump if he was going to placate them and put their interests before the rest of America's?

It's because that narrative hasn't been true for a long time. The real fight is between established politicians and the American people.

Something is out of balance in Washington. Corporations now spend about $2.6 billion a year on reported lobbying expenditures—more than the $2 billion we spend to fund the House ($1.18 billion) and Senate ($860 million). It’s a gap that has been widening since corporate lobbying began to regularly exceed the combined House-Senate budget in the early 2000s.

Today, the biggest companies have upwards of 100 lobbyists representing them, allowing them to be everywhere, all the time. For every dollar spent on lobbying by labor unions and public-interest groups together, large corporations and their associations now spend $34. Of the 100 organizations that spend the most on lobbying, 95 consistently represent business. (via The Atlantic)

In modern politics, there is no conservative or liberal. There is only a united front that works to protect the interests of rich businesses and individuals. The lobbyists spend insane amounts of money to get the support of both Democrats and Republicans in the White House. They are counting on the American people to look the other way as they favor these businesses over us.

That was why everyone (except for the American people) was so opposed to Donald Trump. He didn't represent another traditional conservative in the White House. He represented an end to decades of insider politics, where our leaders protected the interests of a few big businesses, at the expense of the rest of us.

It's why the median income for a family today is worse than it was in the 1990s. We've had sixteen years of big businesses running our country. They've shipped jobs overseas, reduced the salaries they give out to their workers, all the while raising the cost of living.

Make no mistake, business owners big and small were strongly supporting Hillary because she would allow this trend to continue.  She'd have no choice- she's taken the money of these donors and lobbyists for years. In an effort to make herself and Bill comfortable after 2000, they sold out whatever principles they had, by taking money from Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Canadian bankers, and others.

It's why dirtbags like Matt Mahoney, CEO of GrubHub, are willing to break the law by attacking their employees for voting for Trump.

Matt Maloney, CEO of food delivery service GrubHub, is demanding that all employees who agree with Donald Trump’s rhetoric resign immediately.

Fox News reports that Maloney delivered his demand via a company-wide email with the subject line, “So… that happened… what’s next?’

The email’s body begins, “I’m still trying to reconcile my own worldview with the overwhelming message that was delivered last night.”...

But then you get down to the second-last paragraph, and it reads, “If you do not agree with this statement then please reply to this email with your resignation because you have no place here. We do not tolerate hateful attitudes on our team.” (via Milo).

This ignorant man cannot even see the hypocrisy in his own email. While attacking Trump supporters for being "intolerant," he demands their resignation. Those who don't resign should expect a hostile and discriminatory environment from here on out.

Do you really think the CEO of a business that caters to American consumers thinks Trump's a bigot?  Nope. He was counting on Hillary to continue to favor businesses over their employees. He was counting on policies that would help him become stinking rich while paying very little to his people. Startups, in particular, have a lot to overcome to see success. For the people at the top to get rich, they have to pay the bare minimum to their staff. They often hire them as freelancers, refusing to offer full-time benefits and wages.

And when he saw his hopes dashed to pieces, he lashed out with an email that will surely mean a loss of business, maybe a lawsuit.

Everything that the left tried to throw at Trump was a lie. He's not a racist, bigot, sexist or whatever else they said. It was merely a concerted effort by rich, powerful institutions to protect their interests- interests that would evaporate when a fair-minded negotiator, a leader with no special interests to control him, took office.

In the coming years, we will see a significant shake-up in this country. Don't be surprised if you see some trust-busting, as big conglomerates are dismantled. Companies will collapse. Industries will be transformed. It will all be for the good, as American consumers, voters, and workers will see their wages increased, their costs lowered, and their futures made brighter.